How to Find the Correct Leg Band Size for your Bird

Did you know, National Band & Tag manufactures leg bands ranging in size from a hummingbird to a swan? With so many leg band sizes to choose from, it may be confusing to find the correct size for your species of bird.

There are two different options for finding out which leg band size you should order:

Option 1: Find the diameter of your bird’s leg. The easiest way to do this is to use a piece of string. You might want to have one person hold the bird, while another holds the string and measures.

  • Step 1: Place the tip of a string onto the bird’s leg where the band is going to sit. Wrap the string around the leg until the string reaches the tip on the end of the string you are holding in place.
  • Step 2: Mark the point where the string touches the tip with a marker.
  • Step 3: Stretch the string out across the length of the ruler and then locate the mark on the string. Read the measurement on the ruler. This tells you the circumference of the bird’s leg.
  • Step 4: Divide your circumference measurement by 3.14. (Example: a circumference of 34.54 mm / 3.14 = a diameter of 11 mm)

Option 2: Check for your species on the USGS’s Recommended Band Size chart. This is a guideline, and NB&T is not responsible for incorrect size bands being ordered based on this chart. While the USGS’s list is reliable for most standard birds, your bird could be slightly different. For example, wild mallards usually wear a size 14 band, but farm-raised mallards tend to be a little fatter and may need to go up to a size 16 band.

find your perfect size leg band for birds

Next Steps:

Now that you know the diameter of your bird’s leg, you can view our bird bands and find the band that correlates with your diameter. From our example in option 1, if the diameter is 11 mm, then our size 14 at 11.13 mm would be the best option. It’s ok for the band to be slightly bigger. You don’t want the band to be too tight, otherwise, it can cause damage to the leg. When ordering your leg bands, don’t forget that each size band needs its matching applicator to properly seal it. If you are ordering multiple sizes of bands, you will also need multiple applicators.

World Migratory Bird Day 2020: Birds Connect Our World

What is World Migratory Bird Day?

In 2018, the Environment for the Americas (EFTA), joined the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), and the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA), to create a single, global, bird conservation education campaign, World Migratory Bird Day! This day is an annual awareness-raising campaign highlighting the need for the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats.

World Migratory Bird Day Poster

We celebrate World Migratory Bird Day on the second Saturday of May in the US and Canada (May 9, 2020), and the second Saturday of October in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean (October 10, 2020). There are two celebration days a year because migratory birds are all migrating at different times in different parts of the world. The 2020 World Migratory Bird Day conservation theme, Birds Connect Our World, focuses on the tracking technologies used to explore the routes of migratory birds across the globe, and how this knowledge is used to inform conservation.

How NB&T Supports World Migratory Bird Day:

National Band & Tag is a supporter of migratory birds, and World Migratory Bird Day because we manufacture millions of bird bands each year. Researchers and conservationists use our bird bands to track birds and collect data. Our bands fit in with this year’s theme of Birds Connect Our World because our bands are used for tracking! Bands have been used since 1595 to track and identify birds. Other bird tracking systems include satellite tags, light-level geolocators, weather radars, satellite imagery, and data from people using birding apps. Tracking migratory birds provides us with lots of useful information! We learn about the places where birds nest, stop to rest, and where they spend the non-nesting months. We can examine their habitats, threats they face on the ground, and how we can help improve their migratory journey.

World Migratory Bird Day, Federal Bird Bands used by the USGS bird banding lab

How to Participate in World Migratory Bird Day while in Quarantine:

It’s a crazy time we live in right now. We aren’t able to get out and take a bird tour or attend a local WMBD activity. But there are still lots of ways you can celebrate World Migratory Bird Day from home! Check out www.migratorybirdday.org/resources for WMBD coloring pages, at-home scavenger hunts, and activity pages. You can also go birding in your backyard. Observe what birds you can see from your home, and then try learning more about your local birds online. Show off how you are celebrating WMBD on social media using #WMBD2020, #WorldMigratoryBirdDay, and #BirdsConnectOurWorld.

National Poultry Day

March 19th is National Poultry Day! It’s a day when we recognize domesticated birds that are raised for meat or eggs. “Poultry” includes chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, quail, pheasants, guineafowl, squab, and other domesticated birds.

National Band & Tag manufactures a variety of products for poultry identification such as wing bands, leg bands, and clip-on blinders. We started out selling wing bands and leg bands for chickens back in 1902. To celebrate National Poultry Day, we are recognizing chickens by creating a side by side history timeline of chickens, NB&T, and how the industry grew in the 1900s.

History of Chickens, the Broiler Industry, and National Band & Tag in the 1900s

(Click the pictures below to make them larger.)

National Poultry Day - Chicken Timeline from 1900s

National Poultry Day - History of Chickens

 

 

Chickens & The Broiler Industry History:

1800s – 1900s:  Chickens are mostly owned by backyard farmers who use them for eggs. They are considered a delicacy, usually only eaten for holidays, special occasions, or when they are no longer producing eggs. By the beginning of the 1900s, a few entrepreneurs start selling young chickens in the summers for meat as a side business for their family farms.

1916: Pedigree chicken breeding starts. Founded when Robert C. Cobb Senior purchased a farm in Littleton, MA, forming Cobb’s Pedigreed Chicks.

1920s: Vitamin D was discovered in the early 1920s, which led to a revolution in poultry keeping. Hens could now survive through the winter months with Vitamin D supplements and go on to produce healthier chicks in the spring. Now that they can be raised indoors, people start building designated chicken coops. This all helped reduce the high mortality rate of chickens.

1923: Cecile Steele is the pioneer of the commercial broiler industry. Steele ordered 50 chicks for egg production; by mistake, she received 500 chicks. Instead of returning them, she saw an opportunity. She waited until the chickens reached 2 pounds live weight and sold them for a profit at 62 cents a pound. She increased her numbers in 1924 to 1,000 chicks, 10,000 in 1926, and 26,000 in 1928.

1939-1945: WW2 creates a ration on beef, pork, and lamb. People are encouraged to raise and eat more chicken. By the end of the war, Americans are eating 3 times more chicken than they were before the war.

1942: The government approves a new form of cleaning and packing ready-to-cook whole chickens in ice in wooden crates.

1948: Post war, “Chicken of Tomorrow” contest encourages breeders to create bigger, better broilers. Arbor Acres White Rocks’ white-feathered birds beat out the higher-performing Red Cornish crosses from the Vantress Hatchery. These two breeds would eventually be crossed and become the Arbor Acre breed whose genetics now dominate poultry farms worldwide today.

1950: Broilers are now the #1 source of poultry meat. Almost all Americans now have a modern, bottom cooling refrigerator, which has set a new standard of food storage and food safety

1952: The commercial broiler industry begins its economic boom. Specially bred meat chickens (“broilers”) surpass farm chickens as the number one source of chicken meat in the United States.

1970s: The broiler industry focuses on nutritional discoveries, disease eradication programs, and genetic improvements.

1980s: Consumers are starting to prefer cut-up and further-processed chickens to the traditional whole bird. Chicken surpasses pork consumption in 1985.

1990s: Chicken becomes the top-selling meat, surpassing beef. The movement towards natural, organic birds and eggs begins with more attention towards animal welfare.

 

National Band & Tag History:

1902: Joseph Haas starts to manufacture poultry leg and wing bands. He had been informed that breeders were improving their flocks, and it was necessary to distinguish one fowl from another. Visualizing the possibilities of a new industry, Haas went to work designing a few patterns of bands. Crude at first, they improved with recommendations from customers and experimental projects. He continued to make improvements until he came up with bands that worked. Ads were placed in poultry magazines, and although he had no competition, orders were slow.

1914: National Band & Tag makes its first move from a small barn to a garage, still in Newport, KY. NB&T now employs 3 people, one being Haas’s youngest son who was 11 years old.

1926: Business takes off for National Band & Tag! With the start of the broiler industry, more and more people are now raising chickens. The business moves from the garage to a building on Orchard St. in Newport, KY. Haas’s eldest son joins the business, and NB&T now employs 10 people.

1939: National Band & Tag invents Anti-Pix Chicken Glasses to help stop cannibalism in flocks. A year later in 1940, the “Jiffy” wing band is invented as an alternative to the “Zip” wing band.

1952: Now shipping worldwide, and profiting from the broiler industries’ economic boom, NB&T relocates from Orchard St. to a larger building on York St., Newport KY, which is where it still is today.

1957: C-LESS peepers are invented using aluminum to replace the chicken glasses

1968: The new “Tab End” wing band is invented. NB&T now employs 50 people.

1980s: National Band & Tag now has 3rd and 4th generation family members working together. NB&T continues to purchase surrounding land to expand the building.

1990s: NB&T celebrates 90 years of business in 1992.

 

Memorial Bird Bands

A great way to memorialize bird hunters who are no longer with us is with Memorial Bird Bands.

Customers use our Memorial Bird Bands as a memento to hand out to friends and family at the funeral. Some people will then put the bird band on their lanyard or keychain so that they can carry it around with them every day as a remembrance of their loved one. Hunting buddies or hunt clubs may want to pass out the bands amongst its members in honor of the deceased. Some will raffle off the memorial bands to help raise money for the family. We even had one customer put the memorial bands in honor of her son on ducks, so duck hunters would call for years saying they got one of the banded birds in tribute of her son.

 

Here are some of the ways our customers have customized their Memorial Bird Bands:

 

Memorial bird bands

IN LOVING MEMORY OF BRANDON MAUGLE 06/19/93-04/16/14

 

RIP MEMORIAL BANDS

JEFFERY WILKINS 4/23/1964 – 8/7/2016

LIVE LOVE DREAM MEMORIAL BIRD BANDS

STEVEN N. KENDRICK 02/09/99 – 01/27/19 LIVE – LOVE – DREAM

REST IN PEACE BIRD BANDS FOR HUNTERS

LEGENDS NEVER DIE RIP JB 12/2/12

DUCK MEMORIAL BANDS FOR LANYARDS

KELLY KEITH EADS 05/12/1997-01/21/2019 GET LOWER & SHOOT HIGHER

 

Click here to view our bird band sizes.

Bird bands come in multiple sizes and colors and can be customized with your text.

 

 

 

 

Duck and Goose Proposal Bands

Are you a bird hunting enthusiast ready to propose to your significant other? National Band & Tag is here to help with Duck or Goose sized leg bands stamped with “WILL YOU MARRY ME?”. Each pack comes with 5 bands. Proposal bands are sold on Amazon and ship in 2-3 business days. The duck size bands are our size 14 bands, which have a 7/16″ inside diameter. The goose bands are our size 24 bands, which have a 3/4″ inside diameter. Interested in a more custom band? You can buy a custom stamped bird leg bands directly through NB&T. Stamping can include names, dates or more.

proposal bands for use on duck or geese while bird hunting

HOW IT WORKS:

You can use these bands to propose in any way you would like, but the most popular way is when your significate other shoots a bird, to run over and get it for them, to slide the band on the leg and then bring it back to have them read. If you have a different or creative way to propose using our leg bands, comment below to share with us. If your significant other said yes, share your pictures with us on Facebook.

Authentic Metal Replica Leg Bands

Are you looking for the real deal, authentic, duck or goose replica bands? National Band & Tag manufacturers federal bird bands used by the North American Bird Banding Program, so there is a good chance that the band found on your bird, was manufactured by us in the first place. Don’t fall for a fake Replica Bands. Use the tips below so that you can tell the difference between a knock-off and an authentic Replica Band.

Check out the difference between National Band & Tag’s Replica Bands and the other guys:

National Band & Tag’s Authentic Replica Bands:

  • Stamping 100% matches the original bird band
  • Made from .064” plain aluminum
  • Letters are in all caps, stamped from a press
  • We verify all Certificates of Appreciation with the USGS so that there are no fake bands being produced

Non-Authentic Replica Bands:

  • They put their own phone number and website on the band instead of the USGS’s.
  • Made of other materials or colors
  • Letters are uneven or hand-engraved
  • The stamp any number you give them

Metal Authentic Replica Bird Bands

For Replica Band pricing and more information, click here.

Custom Wedding Bird Bands

Banded for Life

Did you know, we can create custom duck or goose bands for your proposal, save-the-dates, or wedding favors?

Well, we have a new one to add to the list, Name Card Holders!

One of our creative customers got stamped leg bands and cut slits in the name tags so that they would slide over the sides of the bands. The bands featured below are our Style 1242-20 (5/8″ diameter), Butt-End Bands, in plain aluminum. These are the same types of bands that the USGS Bird Banding Laboratory uses on birds in the wild for research. This couple customized their bands with “Banded On”, the wedding date, and their names. We can customize bands with almost any text. Most couples like to put their wedding date on the second line in a bigger text because then it looks similar to an actual federal band.

wedding custom bird bands for name holders

Do you have a creative way that you used our bird leg bands? Share in the comments below! To see other ways customers have used bird leg bands, check out our blog.

International Owl Awareness Day

Fun Fact: There are over 200 species of owls in the world

Banded owl for International Owl Awareness Day

This Sunday, August 4th is International Owl Awareness Day! NB&T is celebrating with the top 10 oldest banded owls according to the “USGS Bird Banding Laboratory’s Longevity Records of North American Birds“. According to the Bird Banding Lab, the oldest banded owl is a 28-year-old Great Horned Owl, located in Ohio. It was banded on 3/9/1977 and encountered on 3/24/2005. This Great Horned Owl was found with an injury and placed into captivity. On our oldest banded bird list, the 2nd, 5th, 7th and 9th oldest birds are also Great Horned Owls. Other species on the top 10 list include Barred Owl, Snowy Owl, Northern Spotted Owl, and Great Gray Owl.USGS Owl chart

National Band & Tag Company manufacturers metal leg bands that are also used to band owls. Different types of research and conservation organizations will band owls to monitor the population, mating, movement, diet, etc. so that they can better improve their conservation efforts. Many species of owls that are endangered or threated is due to loss of environment. Owls are important for the environment because they help control rodent populations.

Have you ever encountered a banded owl? Share your story in the comments section below or join the conversation on social media by using  #InternationalOwlAwarenessDay.

 

 

 

National Wildlife Day

Today, February 22nd is National Wildlife Day! Also celebrated on September 4th, the 22nd was added to honor the memory and birthday of wildlife conservationist, Steve Irwin.

National Wildlife Day was created to bring awareness of endangered animals that need to be preserved and rescued from their diminishing populations. This day is also used to acknowledge zoos and animal sanctuaries for everything they do to help preserve this planet’s animals and educate the public about conservation. National Wildlife Day is celebrated on two dates, to double the effort to help bring awareness of the plight of wild animals around the globe. NWD encourages wildlife lovers to stand up and fight for animals that need a voice, to visit their local zoo and donate what they can to make a difference in the lives endangered animals lives.

National Band & Tag is excited to celebrate today by recognizing all our conservation, zoo, and sanctuary customers! The research and conservation efforts that our customers make is inspiring, and we are happy to know that they use our products to help make a difference. We have had the opportunity to meet a lot of these great people the past two years at The Wildlife Society Conference, and we are excited to get to work with more conservationists in the future to meet all their identification needs.

Learn more about National Wildlife Day here: http://www.nationalwildlifeday.com/

Banded for Life

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow, and we are celebrating with some different species of birds that not only mate for life, but that researchers and conservationist have banded with NB&T bird bands for life.

Bald Eagles are monogamous birds that generally mate for life unless a pair is unable to produce eggs, and if one partner dies, the remaining partner will seek out a new mate. During courtship, these raptors have various flight displays including a fantastic cartwheeling fall where the pair locks talons in midair.

Barn Owls are solitary creatures until they find and pair off with a mate. They mate for life and become very emotionally attached to their partner. Barn Owls can often be seen cuddling with their partner and babies in their nest.

Geese are very loyal birds who will mate for life and are very protective of their partners and offspring. When a goose’s mate dies, that bird will mourn in seclusion. Some geese spend the rest of their lives as widows or widowers, refusing to mate again.

Laysan Albatrosses return to the colony three years after fledging, but do not mate for the first time until seven or eight years old. During these four or five years, they form bonds with a mate that they will keep for life.

Ravens mate for life and live in pairs in a fixed territory. When their children reach adolescence, they leave home and join other adolescences. These flocks of young birds live and eat together until they mate and pair-off.

Sandhill Cranes mate for life and when they form a pair, the bond can last for years, until one of the cranes dies. After a mate passes away, the surviving crane will seek out a new mate.

Swans mate for life, although “divorce” sometimes occurs, particularly following nesting failure, and if a mate dies, the remaining swan will take up with another.

Learn about more birds who mate for life here.

Leg Bands for Pet Ducks and Geese

The most popular way to know if one of your pet waterfowl are shot by a hunter is to band its leg with a band. Most of our customers like to stamp their name or farm name and phone number on their leg bands. Our aluminum leg bands can be customized with any text you would like (up to a certain character limit depending on band size), as well as multiple colors.

Mallards are usually a size 14.

Canadian Geese are usually a size 28.

Promotional Waterfowl Bands

In the Ducks Unlimited article, 15 Great Places to Hunt Waterfowl it lists top cities and areas in the United States and Canada to hunt all different species of waterfowl, such as mallards, Canadian geese, pintails, green-winged teal, mottled ducks, and more.

If your business is in the hunting industry and located in one of these popular waterfowl areas, try promoting your business with customized, promotional waterfowl leg bands! Have your company’s name, website, phone number etc. stamped on the band and hand them out to your customers to help spread the word and get repeat customers year after year. These fun souvenir bands make great giveaways for out of town people visiting to hunt. Customers can place the waterfowl leg bands on their lanyards and always have a reminder of your business.

Our style 1242-14 is the style used for mallard ducks, and a style 1242-28 is used on geese for those who want to be authentic. Otherwise our style 1242-24 is a popular size for promotional lanyard bands. All of our sizes and colors that are available can be viewed here.

Order today to have your customized bands in time for the upcoming season!

Hunt Test Bands for Hunting Retriever Clubs

A hunt test is an event where the natural ability and training of gun dogs are tested and evaluated. Hunt tests are organized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), the North American Hunting Retriever Association (NAHRA), and the Hunting Retriever Club (HRC). The AKC awards the titles of Junior, Senior, and Master Hunter for performance in hunt tests. The hunting dogs are put in conditions that are encountered when hunting, and their performance on finding and retrieving birds is how they are rated.

A typical HRC hunt test is divided into two series of evaluations, the land series and the water series. In each series the dogs are evaluated for their natural retrieving desire, memory, marking ability, and obedience to their handler’s commands.

NB&T manufactures Hunt Test Bird Leg Bands, which these competitions use as giveaways to the winners to go on their lanyards. Check out these examples below of our Butt-End Bands that different hunting clubs have used.

Style 1242-24 Aluminum

Style 1242-24 Aluminum

Style 1242-24 Green Aluminum

Style 1242-24 Plain Aluminum

Style 1242-24 Plain Aluminum

Style 1242-16 Gold Aluminum

National American Eagle Day

June 20th is National American Eagle Day! This day is used to commemorate the anniversary of the Bald Eagle being selected as our National Symbol, to celebrate its physical recovery to America’s skies, and to observe the American values, ideals, and attributes for which it stands.

On June 20, 1782, the Bald Eagle was selected as the U.S.A.’s National Emblem, and in 1995, the American Eagle Foundation was able to get President Bill Clinton to recognize the first American Eagle Day.

Bald Eagles almost went extinct in the 1960’s due to loss of habitat, but they were brought off the endangered species list in 2007 due to the work of conservationists and strict protection laws. To better learn about eagles and to conserve them is where National Band & Tag comes in with our aluminum Lock-On Leg Bands and Rivet Leg Bands. These custom stamped and numbered leg bands help researchers and conservationist track eagles and learn more about them.

Aluminum Lock-On Bands have a tab that folds over and can be sealed using pliers while the Rivet Band uses pop rivets and a pop rivet gun to seal the rivet band around the bird’s leg. These unique features make these bands great for eagles and other birds of prey.

Bald Eagle: Size 8A or 9
Golden Eagle: Size 9, 9A or 9C

(These sizes are recommended from the USGS Bird Banding Laboratory and should only be used as a guide. NB&T is not responsible for incorrect sizes being ordered based on these recommendations.)

Lock On Band

Rivet Bands

To participate in Nation American Eagle Day, try various activities such as visiting the eagles at your local zoo, donating to an eagle conservation program, viewing live eagle nest cameras, or posting on social media using the hashtag #NationalAmericanEagleDay.

Gold Colored Wing Bands and Leg Bands

Treat your birds like royalty with gold colored leg bands and wing bands! Gold and orange aluminum, and brass, all look like gold! Below are all the options of leg and wing bands available in gold colors. Click which style you would like for more information and pricing.

Atlas Seal 305A & 305AL Adjustable Leg Bands (Anodized)

Gold Aluminum

Orange Aluminum

Atlas Seal 305ABR Adjustable Leg Band

Brass

Butt-End 1242 Leg Band

Gold Aluminum

Jiffy 893B Wing Band

Brass

Gold and Neon Green material for Wing Band Styles Zip 890, Jiffy 893, and Zip 892

Gold Aluminum

Banded for Life

Do you and your significant other both enjoy bird hunting? Then incorporate your love of goose and duck hunting into your wedding with NB&T custom leg bands! Here are a few examples of how past customers have added bird bands and their love of hunting into their wedding.

Proposal
Try taking your significant other hunting, and when they shoot a bird, run over to grab it for them and put your proposal band around the bird’s leg.

(Shown – Style 1242-14. Duck band for mallards and other adult wild ducks)

Save The Date
Looking for a unique save the date? Try having “save the date”, your names and wedding date stamped on a bird band.

(Shown – Style 1242-28. Large band for Geese, Canadian Geese, and Wild Turkeys)

Wedding Favor for Guest
Wrap a band stamped with your names and wedding date around the top of a bag of treats for your guest. Or set a band at everyone’s place setting.

(Shown – Style 1242-28. Large band for Geese, Canadian Geese, and Wild Turkeys)

Share how you included bird bands at your wedding below!

Federal Replica Bird Band Report

replica bird bands

Replica Bird Bands

Did you know, National Band & Tag manufactures federal bird bands used by the North American Bird Banding Program? The banding program is jointly administered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Canadian Wildlife Service. They are headquartered at the Bird Banding Laboratory located at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland. Every year, the Bird Banding Laboratory receives about 1.2 million banding records from Master Banders, and 87,000 encounter records from hunters and researchers.

After you have encountered a banded bird, you can report the band number online to the USGS. They will then send you a Certificate of Appreciation with your name on it, information about the bird, where it was banded and where you encountered it.

Reporting this information is important because the USGS will then relay the data back to the original bander for their research. Research can range from population, migration patterns, harvest rates, species health and more.

National Band & Tag has the approval from the Bird Banding Program to manufacture federal Replica Bands for those with a Certificate of Appreciation. These are exact replicas of the original federal band that you found on the bird. Authentic federal bird bands cannot be replicated by anyone else except National Band & Tag. Replica Bands are popular for groups of people who aren’t sure who shot the banded bird, for those who lost the original band, or for hunters who want the original band on their mount and a replica for their lanyard.

We looked at Replica Band orders from 12/1/13 – 12/31/2017 and collected data from the Certificates of Appreciation to see what species, sex, age, etc. the birds are that we make the most Replica Bands for. Below are our findings.

Q: What species of bird are the most Replica Bands made for?
A: Mallards

(“Other” Category Includes: Black Brant, Green-Winged Teal, Lesser Scaup, Common Eider, Mottled Duck, American Wigeon, Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Aleutian Canada Goose, American Black Duck, Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck, Bufflehead, Cackling Goose, Canvasback, Cinnamon Teal, Gadwall, Mourning Dove, Ring-Necked Duck, Snow X Blue Goose Intergrade, and Surf Scoter).

 

Q: Are Replica Bands made for more male or female birds?
A: Male

Q: What species of bird had the farthest distance between banding and encounter locations that a Replica Band was made for?
A:
3,380 miles (5541 KM) – Male, Black Brant, hatched in 2012, banded 7/15/14 in Alaska, and encountered 7/15/16 in Mexico.

 

Q: What species of bird had the farthest distance between banding and encounter locations within the continental United States that a Replica Band was made for?
A: 1,602 miles (2578 KM) – Male, Green-Winged Teal, hatched in 2009, banded 9/23/2009 in North Dakota, encountered 1 /11/2011 in Louisiana.

 

Q: What is the oldest federal band that a Replica was made for?
A:
1971 – Male, Black Brant, hatched in 1969, banded 7/10/1971 in Alaska, encountered 2/19/1976 in Oregon.

 

Q: What is the oldest banded bird that a Replica was made for?
A:
Canada Goose, 23 years old. Hatched 1978, banded 7/28/1978 in Alaska, encountered 1/9/2001 in Oregon. (Sex unknown).

 

Q: What was the shortest amount of time between a bird being banded and encountered that a Replica Band was made for?
A: 20 days – Female, Blue-Winged Teal, hatched in 2011, banded 9/5/2012 in North Dakota, encountered 9/25/2012 in Louisiana.

 

Q: Are more Replica Bands made for birds that were originally banded in the United States or Canada?
A: United States – 55% of Certificates of Appreciation (Canada 45%)

 

Q: What year were the most birds banded in that a Replica was made for?
A: 2013

 

Q: What state had the most encounters that a Replica Band was made for?
A: Arkansas and Louisiana

 

Q: What is the average amount of time between a bird being banded and encountered that NB&T Replica Bands are made for?
A: Average of 3 years

 

Are you interested in ordering a Replica Band? Get information, pricing, and more here.

Promote your Business with Custom Leg Bands

We can manufacture custom Butt-End bands to help promote your business, whether that be a lanyard maker, duck call maker, electrical application or any other type of business.

The first step is to determine what size band you will need, measure the diameter of the object you are trying to band (lanyard, wire, duck call, etc.).

After determining which size band you need, you can pick your color and decide what you want stamped on the bands. We can stamp your name, website, phone number, logo, etc.

National Band & Tag Sizes – Aluminum Butt-End Bands – Style 1242

1242-3 bird band 1242-4 bird band 1242-5 bird band 1242-6 bird band 1242-7 bird band
1242-8 bird band 1242-10 bird band 1242-12 bird band 1242-14 bird band 1242-16 bird band
1242-18 bird band 1242-20 bird band 1242-22 bird band 1242-24 bird band 1242-28 bird band

How to Close a Butt-End Band:

  1. Place the opened band around the lanyard, duck call, mount, etc.
  2. While using the correct size applicator, make sure to fit the band into the lower hole of the applicator.
  3. Squeeze the applicator shut to correctly seal the band.

(If the band does not shut all the way on the first time, rotate the band in the applicator and squeeze the applicator again. Continue rotating the band and squeezing the applicator until it is completely shut.)

Happy Thanksgiving!

To celebrate Turkey Day, we are featuring our leg bands and wing bands for both domestic and wild turkeys.

Rivet Bands – Style # 1242FR9 (7/8” diameter) for turkeys, and wild turkeys. Style 1242FR9A (1” diameter) for turkey toms.

There are different types of wing bands that can be used as well. If you prefer plastic, we offer a larger polyurethane wing band. Of if you prefer metal we offer self-piercing wing band.

Customize your bands with your logo!

logo 1242Looking for a metal leg or wing band with your logo stamped on it? We can make a custom hardened steel stamp of your logo!  There is a one-time charge of $200 to $500 or more (depending on the detail of the logo) to make the stamp block. We will keep your logo stamp block on file for future orders that you would like to have stamped with your logo.

For a quote, please submit your logo in black and white line art to [email protected].

Example:

bad logo example

good logo example